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Living the “Mod” Life

Remember when eggs were bad for you?  Then it changed back to eggs were good for you, in moderation?

Julia Child was once asked about all the butter and fat in her recipes and how could that be healthy for you?  She replied that her recipes called for a teaspoon of hollandaise sauce on the asparagus, not a half a cup like most Americans use.  Child contended that butter and fat can be healthy if they’re used in moderation.

The American Cancer Society has updated their guidelines for cancer prevention through diet and exercise.   Nearly 20% of cancer cases are caused by these factors people can control, especially not smoking.  Of course, the new guidelines recommend getting more physical activity and staying at a healthy weight for your body type; but what’s new includes less (or no) processed and red meats and no alcohol. 

“There is no one food or even food group that is adequate to achieve a significant reduction in cancer risk,” Laura Makaroff, DO, American Cancer Society Senior Vice President, Prevention and Early Detection, said. “People should eat whole foods, not individual nutrients, she said, because evidence continues to suggest that healthy dietary patterns are associated with reduced risk for cancer.”

It’s all about how, not what you eat, that makes the difference.  It’s about making healthy choices.  Every night while I’m out for my easy, slow walk and a jogger passes me, I think to myself, at least I’m going faster than the guy sitting on the couch. 

So, stay moderate, my friends.  Great strides don’t have to happen overnight.  You don’t have to eat a pound of blueberries to prevent cancer.  Just a few everyday will do it.  But, according to the new guidelines, it can’t be blueberry wine. 

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